How Safe Are Pain Medications?

The primary thing that motivates people to seek help is PAIN.

An important study looking at some of the risks associated with the chronic use of nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for pain was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1999. The study showed 16,500 NSAID‐related deaths occur among patients with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis every year in the United States AND THAT IS A CONSERVATIVE ESTIMATE. If deaths from gastrointestinal toxic effects of NSAIDs were tabulated separately in the National Vital Statistics reports, these effects would constitute the 15th most common cause of death in the United States.   Yet these toxic effects remain largely a ‘silent epidemic,’ with many physicians and most patients unaware of the magnitude of the problem.   A prescription form of NSAID have been available in the US since February 1999, in the hope that they will have a reduced capacity to cause injury to the gastroduodenal mucosa. However, these are known to cause defects in renal function, cause osteoporosis, impair female reproductive function, and increase the rate of blood clots in patients with increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Furthermore, these statistics do not include deaths ascribed to the use of over‐the‐counter NSAIDs like ADVIL, ALEVE, TYLENOL.